Godcaster – Christ In Capsule Form (Single Review)

So, once again, I sit in front of a computer screen with the self-imposed labor of love that is reviewing the latest Godcaster release. I drink a glass of cognac in the bathtub, sob for a half an hour, tack on my reading glasses, and proceed to embark on this undertaking. Reviewing Godcaster is a bit like wrangling a Gremlin from the movie Gremlins. Remember Gremlins? Same godless, untethered energy.

“Christ In Capsule Form” is the latest single from the enigmatic experimental rock group, whose previous releases have been loud, rip-snorting imitations of Zappa and his ilk. At only 58 seconds, it’s their shortest release, but also their most viscerally intense. Here, the band tries on their math rock hats, jerking from time signature to time signature, while vocalist Judson Kolk shrieks out his typical brand of surrealist lyrics in time with the dizzying tempo. Godcaster’s instrumentation is first-rate, with consummate drummer Sam Pickard expertly playing and keeping time to these wacky time signatures, and keyboardist David McFaul exposing this track to the elements by adding layers of atmosphere via synthesizer.

“Christ in Capsule Form” fills in the ongoing Godcaster mythology with lines like “and when you take your godpill, you will be like god” and “Prince of lies, the Satan Snake” (something something Captain Beefheart); virtually incomprehensible missives. There seems to be an underlying theme about the powerful and addictive nature of pills (“I can see Jesus Christ in capsules that they take), but no direct message is particularly discernable.

While the song itself is musically impressive, technicality doesn’t always make for an engaging listening experience. The brevity of the track, as well as the lack of a particularly memorable core, makes “Christ in Capsule Form” an odd choice for a single, especially one to follow the catchy, poppy “She’s a Gun”. This strange departure might herald that it’s time for the mighty and prolific Godcaster to start pulling some of their material together for an official, long-form album or EP. One can only assume it will be every bit as intense and head spinning as their releases thus far have been.

Pros:

  • Unique and interesting structure
  • Impressive instrumentation and vocal delivery
  • Excellent production – every hit is clear and powerful
  • The aesthetic curation of Godcaster is second to none

Cons:

  • Too brief and scatterbrained for a single
  • Glam for the sake of being glam

Listen here.

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